Charlotte Tegan x Connor D'Netto 'Regrowth'

Sale price Price $450.00 Regular price

Shipping calculated at checkout.

Regrowth reflection (bottom right)

Charlotte Tegan & Connor D’Netto 

46 x 30.5 x 2.5 cm

Video and found flowers on scanned aluminium print

Price: $450

# Editions: 1/1


Regrowth reflection II (top left)

Charlotte Tegan & Connor D’Netto 

46 x 30.5 x 2.5 cm

Video and found flowers on scanned aluminium print

Price: $450

# Editions: 1/1


Regrowth vision (top right)

Charlotte Tegan & Connor D’Netto 

46 x 30.5 x 2.5 cm

Video and found flowers on scanned aluminium print

Price: $450

# Editions: 1/1



Regrowth vision II (bottom left)

Charlotte Tegan & Connor D’Netto 

46 x 30.5 x 2.5 cm

Video and found flowers on scanned aluminium print

Price: $450

# Editions: 1/1



Regrowth

Charlotte Tegan & Connor D’Netto 

Morse Code embedded multi-channel video on CRT TV

Price: NFS

 

From the Artists:

We both utilise the re-visiting and re-examining of feelings, locations, or everyday items in our work, which comes through in the re-programming of existing technology or the dissonant challenging of pre-existing ideas. We do this through the use of reflections, distortions, and the re-presentation of visual or audio material in new and different contexts.

We wanted to create something that felt familiar to our respective practices, but
incorporated the changes we’ve both felt in our lives over the course of the last 18
months due to COVID-19. Working simultaneously in our ad-hoc at-home studios, we
subverted the use of scanners and video material to add ephemeral reflections into
permanent still frames. Unable to be reverse-engineered because of the temporal
process distorting the video, the messages will always remain secretive, personal
reflections on the small moments that represent big changes.

We used flowers poached from footpath bushes on Charlotte’s evening walks, extending her previous visual journaling practice of time in lockdown and the act of getting to know her local neighbourhood more closely. The scanning capture method and use of Morse Code have also been in Charlotte’s recent works, as a way to embed personal reflections on second-guessing our own ideas with the passing of time. Connor’s practice of re-filming/capturing video through distorted surfaces and re-purposed technologies led to experimenting with using the scanner to capture time-warped stills from video displayed on an old TV screen. Repurposing a computer program Connor mostly uses in his music composition practice, these home videos around Connor’s garden were embedded with short diary entries. The whole process was a step by step discovery of connections in process and practice, exploring how one idea or technique may parallel with another.


Charlotte: To me, these artworks represent the process of opening myself to
collaboration. My creative practice is deeply personal in both method and content, which I thought would make collaboration difficult or redundant. However, working with Connor showed me that we have a lot of common ground in our practice, and the process of allowing time to talk and bounce ideas off each other in a slow and purposeful way helped to build new meaning together.  I hope people will view the works as encouragement to experiment with what they have within reach, and challenge their conceptions about creative practice.


Connor: Music is my primary practice; my visual art practice mostly springs out of a
musical context. A collaboration like this has been a really lovely journey to work and
explore things from Charlotte’s perspective, which has been fascinating and inspiring. These artworks also represent my step into the visual art community in Brisbane! I hope it might inspire people to look at the things around them a little differently, beyond their intended/obvious purposes and to what they might be, and how this might inspire them to shift your thinking.